Hocking (or Hawkin’) Hills, Ohio

It’s said that no other area in Ohio is as wild, enthralling or photogenic as Hocking Hills State Park. The locals pronounce it Hawkin’ Hills.

This was our last awe-inspiring hiking stop of the trip, and it did not disappoint. The hills are also part of the Allegheny system, and feature massive sandstone outcroppings, deep cool gorges, towering hemlocks and glistening waterfalls. The gorge undergrowth shows off lush maidenhair ferns, rhododendron shrubs, wildflowers, lichens and mosses clinging to the rock faces.

The most outstanding rock formation of the park is its beautiful “Blackhand” sandstone, but shale, limestone, coal and clay are also present.

This dark sandstone exhibits a character similar to Pictured Rocks, Michigan
This dark sandstone exhibits a character similar to Pictured Rocks, Michigan

The sandstone is more than 150 feet thick in the park. Its upper and lower layers are very hard, while the middle layers are easily weathered (where have we seen that before?!). Hocking Hills’ famed rock shelters, caves and recesses were hollowed out of these middle layers. The upper layers form the roof of all overhangs and rock shelters, while the lower layers form the floors. Water has eroded all of these forms, along with freezing, thaw and wind.

Walking down this canyon makes you feel you have entered a different world.
Walking down this canyon makes you feel you have entered a different world.
Like a layer cake alternating with grey and brown frosting in between.
Like a layer cake alternating with grey and brown frosting in between.
Here, too, the water is like root beer and the rocks feel very, very old.
Here, too, the water is like root beer and the rocks feel very, very old.

Nomadic hunters roamed this area at the end of the Ice Age. The Moundbuilders who lived in Ohio from 1 A.D. to 800 A.D. and Fort Ancient Indians from the 1300s to the 1600s used Hocking’s overhangs and recesses for shelter. Wyandot, Delaware and Shawnee nations also hunted and traveled through this area.

The rock overhang cave structures here remind us of the Navajo sites in AZ and NM.
The rock overhang cave structures here remind us of the Navajo sites in AZ and NM.

dsc07343-1

This state park is so beautifully appointed -- nothing gets in the way of nature's majesty
This state park is so beautifully appointed — nothing gets in the way of nature’s majesty

dsc07341

Hocking’s timber was used to make charcoal to fuel the iron furnaces of Ohio. Beds of coal were also found. Coal has remained an important mineral resource in eastern Hocking County, but since coal is falling on increasingly hard times at present, we expect that this area will likely see some economic depression. It will need to depend on its tourism draw more than ever.

 

Advertisements

The Alleghenies of West Virginia

My goodness, there isn’t a straight, level road in all of eastern West Virginia! It takes forever to get from Point A to Point B – more hills and hollers than in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia combined!! Or so it seemed to us. But such beautiful country, it was worth the winding drives and slow progress to Blackwater Falls State Park in the northeast corner of the state. And we got to see the unique rock spine of Tuscarora sandstone that is the pride of Seneca Rock Park, along the way.

So different from the Appalachian range, the Allegheny hills are gorgeous in their own right.
So different from the Appalachian range, the Allegheny hills are gorgeous in their own right.
This is actually called Germany Valley, and it makes sense. Looks a lot like southern Bavaria.
This is actually called Germany Valley, and it makes sense. Looks a lot like southern Bavaria.
This is Seneca Falls, and the jagged-toothed sandstone outcropping showcased there.
This is Seneca Falls, and the jagged-toothed sandstone outcropping showcased there.

Blackwater Falls is highly rated for beauty, and the ratings don’t lie. We hiked to the lower and upper lookout platforms, as well as the ridge trail along the gorge – it’s almost like the Black Canyon of the Gunnison for the eastern US. A deep gorge in the sandstone has been carved by the Blackwater River over millennia, and we who are familiar with the reddish-brown water of the Tahquamenon River of Upper Michigan know that this is caused by the tannins of oak and fir trees leaching into the river – same deal here. Gigantic rhododendron bushes cling to the gorge walls, reveling in the water spray from the falls.

Layered sandstone, awash in the spray.
Layered sandstone, awash in the spray.
Blackwater Falls at its lowest flow point.
Blackwater Falls at its lowest flow point.
Huge rhododendron and conifers on the canyon walls
Huge rhododendron and conifers on the canyon walls
Steep canyon downriver from the falls.
Steep canyon downriver from the falls.

From the number of private resorts and campgrounds outside the park, we’re guessing this area is West Virginia’s #1 tourist attraction for in-staters and those in neighboring states. Horseback riding, hang gliding, zip lines, winter skiing, boating/kayaking. Development has been done in a way that doesn’t mar the natural beauty, though. Kudos to West Virginia.

 

To the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, on the Trail of the Lonesome Pine

This is the first line of an old song my dad used to croon, and I found the tune in my head repeatedly as we headed across Virginia to the Shenandoah National Park. We stopped off in (Little) Washington, a village in the eastern foothills of the park, to see good friends and then set up camp in a private park in Luray (the NP doesn’t allow reservations past Labor Day and we wanted confirmed space).

Shenandoah is both similar to and completely different from the Smokies. All of these gently rolling mountains are very eroded – wouldn’t you be after 500 to 800 million years of geologic and weather events? – but Shenandoah is only 2/3 as high in altitude as the Smokies, and a thin sliver of space running down the ridgeback of western Virginia. With many more rock outcroppings, there’s more for a geo-nerd such as myself to observe in Shenandoah. But the vistas from the peaks are magnificent in both ranges, and at this time of year the many hues of the oaks, beeches, sweet gum, sycamores, Virginia creeper, sumac and sassafras are blazing oranges, yellows and bronze. No Michigan sugar maples here, so red, purple and burgundy are missing from the palette, but regardless, we can’t get enough of the breathtaking views and blue horizons.

Seems like you can see all the way to Michigan!
Seems like you can see all the way to Michigan!
Constant companion: the AT!
Constant companion: the AT!
Above the clouds
Above the clouds
Colonel Mustard-Pants on the overlook!
Colonel Mustard-Pants on the overlook!
dsc07278
Sunbeams streaming from above

We hiked the park’s Compton Trail to see the columnar basalt formations at the trail end, which formed by the basalt in lava form being rapidly cooled in Shenandoah’s youth. This forced the giant hexagonal columns to crystallize – over the course of 100 years, which for geology is really fast — from the lava. Such a phenomenon is found in relatively few places on earth, like the high Sierras, eastern Washington, Wyoming’s Devil’s Tower and Ireland’s coast. Crazy cool.

Is this wild or what? Just enormous hexagons!
Is this wild or what? Just enormous hexagons!
On the a Shenandoah trail in the cool morning stillness
On the a Shenandoah trail in the cool morning stillness

Also spent a morning hiking the Dark Hollow Falls trail near the park’s mid-point, and watched as the small trickle of spring water became a greater and greater flow over the miles of trail bed. The reward was a 70-foot cascade over the river canyon by trail’s end.

Always amazing to see how the water cuts through the rock
Always amazing to see how the water cuts through the rock
In the fall one doesn't see high volumes of water, but the tumbling stream is still majestic
In the fall one doesn’t see high volumes of water, but the tumbling stream is still majestic

On the drive to the next trail head, we saw a bobcat kit on the side of the road, looking a bit forlorn. His momma couldn’t have been far off, and she was probably teaching him a lesson about wandering away from her. We trusted that nature would reunite them soon.

Two moderate-to-strenuous hikes made us feel so virtuous, we became a bit cavalier about getting on the next path. Instead of turning right at the head to get on the Chimney Rock Trail, we headed left (my fault) and ended up doing three miles on the “plain old” Appalachian Trail. Actually, there is nothing “plain” about the AT. It’s inspirational and legendary. We figure we’ve hiked 10 miles of it over the course of the past four weeks, as it overlaps with many of the trails we did. The goal for the next few years is to get good enough (stamina, strength and pacing) to hike 12 – 15-mile trails on a regular basis. At this point we can handle eight-milers in a day. We have a long way to go, but having goals is good.

We need to return to Shenandoah as well, in the springtime. Her coat of rhododendron, azalea, mountain laurel and dogwood blooms must be spectacular. And there are nearly as many hikes yet to come in these mountains as there are in the Smokies for us. Plus, we have yet to see a bear….

Final note: we drove to Joel Salatin’s Polyface Farm and Gail Hodges’ Caromont Farm Creamery (artisan goat cheese, naturally!). Both side trips were memorable and delicious for the pastured meats and hand-crafted goat cheese delights, and to witness Joel’s legendary nature-preserving healthy farming techniques.

One of Joel's mobile chicken pens, which are hauled around the field following the cows' grazing patterns -- keeps the worms down and is really good for the land and chickens
One of Joel’s mobile chicken pens, which are hauled around the field following the cows’ grazing patterns — keeps the worms down and is really good for the land and chickens
Polyface Farm is legendary  all over the world for its innovative animal husbandry and care of the land
Polyface Farm is legendary all over the world for its innovative animal husbandry and care of the land
Bet you want a piece, eh?
Bet you want a piece, eh?
We had to get our goat cuddles in!
We had to get our goat cuddles in!
Gail is a former restaurant chef who makes outstanding bloomy rinded cheeses in rural VA
Gail is a former restaurant chef who makes outstanding bloomy rinded cheeses in rural VA

Pony Time on Assateague!

What a perfect antidote to coastal OBX suburbia our visit to Chincoteague and Assateague was. It couldn’t have come at a better time. We drove the 20-mile Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel (interesting!) to get to the peninsula that leads to the famous Pony Islands of Chincoteague (populated, but old-style fishing lifestyle) and Assateague (where the National Seashore/Refuge is). Now this is wonderful nature to see!

For anyone familiar with Marguerite Henry’s books (Misty, Stormy and Sea Star), you know these islands have been inhabited for hundreds of years by wild ponies who swam ashore when a Spanish galleon sank offshore (or so the story goes).

Each July, the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Department rides on horseback from Chincoteague to Assateague to round up 1/3 of the wild pony population for sale to willing buyers. The firefighters are fiercely devoted to the wild ponies, and they actually round up the whole herd three times yearly for health checks, vaccinations, etc. The late-July Pony Penning draws hundreds of thousands of onlookers each year and reduces the herd by 50, just enough to keep the population stable and sustainable on the Virginia side of Assateague. We were so lucky to see 14 of them on a hike around the southeastern end of the island.

The view the ponies have, out over the sale grass to the Atlantic
The view the ponies have, out over the sale grass to the Atlantic
Charming view of Assateague from the lighthouse
Charming view of Assateague from the lighthouse
This is the campground next to the pony penning swim-across zone. We have a waterfront view.
This is the campground next to the pony penning swim-across zone. We have a waterfront view.
Every pony is branded, and records are kept of health and history
Every pony is branded, and records are kept of health and history
Gotta love this stallion -- you can't get closer than 150 yards
Gotta love this stallion — you can’t get closer than 150 yards
I love me a beautiful Painted Pony!
I love me a beautiful Painted Pony!
Isn't she just a gorgeous mare?
Isn’t she just a gorgeous mare?
And this is probably her boyfriend!
And this is probably her boyfriend!

The reserve is noted for its protected salt marshes which are home to many thousands of shore birds and migratory flocks. The ponies get top billing, though. What a treasure. There are many ways to get a glimpse of them, via kayaks, bikes, pontoon cruises and on foot. It’s also gotta be great fun in May-June, when the foals are still quite young and innocent!

Pilot Mountain, Hanging Rock and OBX

Whenever possible we seek out mountains to climb, especially when we’re headed to the beach and unlikely to see upland for days!

Leaving Charlotte, the adventure trail led due north to Pilot Mountain, NC and then east to a peer monadnock* in the distance, Hanging Rock State Park. Quick climbs of both solitary hills revealed the lovely surrounding valleys and fields, including some tobacco fields still being cultivated and Winston-Salem in the distance.

Hikers hand it over the edge
Hikers hang it over the edge
Pilot knob from the ground
Pilot knob from the ground
Isn't this an amazing structure
Isn’t this an amazing structure
George moves out on the overhang
George moves out on the overhang
Bucolic view from the Knob
Bucolic view from the Knob
Why wouldn't you just love rocks!!
Why wouldn’t you just love rocks!!

These lone hills have remained standing over millions of years of erosion of limestone in the area, because they both have hard quartzite caps over the limestone, which prevent the acidic rain and river water from dissolving the limestone. Northwest North Carolina’s Piedmont area has some karst (eroded limestone bedrock with channels, rises and sinkholes), but nothing like Mammoth Caves, the coastal Carolinas or Florida. Mammoth also benefits from hard sandstone caps protecting its limestone subsurface. These isolated NC promontories are unique in the landscape in these parts.

*A monadnock is an isolated hill, ridge or erosion-resistant rising above a plain.

 

While driving due east from here to the Outer Banks, I wanted to get George some East Carolina BBQ, but lo and behold, we actually found a TURKEY BBQ spot, so I could enjoy the feasting, too! I’m allergic to pork, and turkey’s a perfect substitute. What a treat it was: Ben Jones’ BBQ Turkey in the tiny village of Everetts, NC has got it goin’ on! The whole operation is in his outdoor kitchen, which he commands with his wife Sandra. Being ex-military, he and Sandra have everything ship-shape and super-clean, so it’s really inviting. The best part, of course, is the eating, and we stocked up on 3.5 quarts of the good stuff so we could enjoy it at home, too. Was great to meet these lovely people and savor their cooking.

Given that we’re traveling around North America to see the glorious nature and hike as many miles as possible, it’s probably no surprise that we didn’t care for much of the Outer Banks. The northern entry points to the seashore plunk you right into its dense housing and entertainment development. It’s clear that capital investment into luxury vacation real estate has won the day in OBX. We had to drive down to Hatteras Island to actually see unpopulated seashore and wildlife. It’s a harsh compromise. Although early settlement life and undeveloped land can still be seen if you drive all the way down to Frisco, Hatteras and Ocracoke, we won’t be returning to OBX because of the congestion and the likelihood that development will continue to win out over nature.

Finally away from civilization
Finally away from civilization
The primal heartbeat of ocean pounding the shore
The primal heartbeat of ocean pounding the shore

dsc07080

Can't get enough of the undisturbed, raw surf
Can’t get enough of the undisturbed, raw surf
Salt marsh great egrets fight with one another over territory
Salt marsh great egrets fight with one another over territory
Hatteras lighthouse
Hatteras lighthouse
Gorgeous conifer seems to tolerate salt spray well
Gorgeous conifer seems to tolerate salt spray well
Kittyhawk shore walk on the inland side of the island
Kittyhawk shore walk on the inland side of the island

Of course, if you’re going just for the seafood and fish, that’s a different story. We had rockfish, flounder, scallops, clams, and east coast shrimp, and they were spectacular. It’s always the little run-down fish markets that look like they’ve been there a thousand years that seem to have the best to offer. Marvelous.

I should note that the National Historical Monument to the Wright Brothers has been beautifully architected and situated in Kill Devil Hills. The history is faithfully rendered and you get a real feel for what they endured over their months of testing and succeeding with the first viable flying machines. Glad we took it in.

Recreated work sheds, where the brothers refined their models
Recreated work sheds, where the brothers refined their models

dsc07055

Orville on the wing, steering the craft
Orville on the wing, steering the craft
Downhill from the obelisk toward the landing strip of the 1903 flights
Downhill from the obelisk toward the landing strip of the 1903 flights
Looking uphill at the memorial Wright Bros obelisk
Looking uphill at the memorial Wright Bros obelisk

Fun Times with Family in Charlotte, NC

As some folks know, our family hosted six international students when our daughter was in high school and college. We’ve remained in contact with all of them and call them family, but none is closer to us than our Thai daughter who now lives in Charlotte. She married a wonderful North Carolinian and they now have two young daughters. We spent a very busy weekend with them, running to ice skating and swimming lessons, decorating pumpkins and having great meals, and visiting a wildlife sanctuary comprised of exotic animals “rescued” from zoos who didn’t want or need a particular species or specimen any longer. SO great to see them again, and such fun!

Older sister loves the giraffe
Older sister loves the giraffe
Feeding zeebies off the back of the wagon
Feeding zeebies off the back of the wagon
We don't carve our pumpkins, we PAINT 'em!
We don’t carve our pumpkins, we PAINT ’em!
Don't eat me, watusi!
Don’t eat me, watusi!
Younger sister getting her swim groove on
Younger sister getting her swim groove on
Seven-year-old magic on ice skates
Seven-year-old magic on ice skates

Our family has been so blessed by the act of hosting these students and hosting a refugee family years ago, as well. One always receives way more than one gives to such efforts. To us, it’s not just an exchange, it’s an opportunity to change others’ lives and be changed for good. The love, the learning, the laughter and even the challenges make it a priceless enrichment to all involved.

Launching into Appalachia

Our road into the Appalachian Mountains (Smokies + Shenandoah) led through Cumberland Gap, KY. This historic Gap was a very appropriate introduction to North America’s oldest mountain range. Cumberland is beautiful at this time of year, and it initiated road switchbacks and ear-pops from the changes in altitude.

We camped in the National Historic Park campground here, got the next stamp in our US Park Service travelers’ passport, and hiked around a bit at the summit where there are beautiful rock outcroppings (Rock nerd alert: I will regularly post geology pix. If you are bored by rocks, cruise on by). Saw our first back country camping group (hikers who overnight on the trail). Many, many more to come. A stuffed baby black bear at the visitor’s center gave us a look ahead at the thousands of square miles of bear country we were about to launch into. This was the only bear we were to see on this trip.

dsc06665
Backcountry hikers at the cumberland Summit
dsc06699
The Gap between the mountains
dsc06683
View from the summit, with Smokies in the distance

From Cumberland, we cascaded into Tennessee and arrived as quickly as possible in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which was not as speedy as we’d hoped, because the road passed through Pigeon Forge. If you are headed to the Smokies and you DON’T like Las Vegas surroundings, do try to avoid Pigeon Forge. It’s stop-and-go traffic with an eye-popping array of expensive and gaudy tourist traps for 15 miles before you get to the park. Not our cup of tea.

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP) is certainly a jewel in the crown of the US Park Service. Well-appointed, well-run and well-staffed, it can handle its 10 million+ visitors per year. We stayed at Smokemont Campground in the park, a great jumping off point for hikes in the central and southern park zones.

We hiked around Smokemont and into Cherokee, NC the first day, Clingman’s Dome and Andrew’s Bald the second day,

dsc06745
Momma and baby elk in creek
dsc06729
Cow elk being chased through the forest by bull
dsc06736
Welcome sign in Cherokee and English at edge of reservation
dsc06774
George on Andrew’s Bald trail
dsc06747
Coming back to camp in late afternoon: hundreds of visitors in thrall to bull elk and his harem
dsc06771
The first of many Appalachian Trail signs — what a thrill
dsc06787-1
The summit of Andrew’s Bald
dsc06796
Colors coming out in the mountains

and Charlie’s Bunion (favorite of all) the third day. Charlie’s was our first genuinely strenuous mountain hike of eight miles’ length, and we were pretty tuckered at the end. It takes time for flatlanders to adjust to altitude and the 15” step-ups on rocky terrain. But getting out to the “Bunion” was so worth the exertion. Since most of the route was also Appalachian Trail, we had numerous chance encounters with through-hikers, which was also a thrill. Ate lunch in the through-hikers’ platform shelter, where they sleep communally. Saw a sweet group of elderly ladies at an overlook parking lot who were all visiting in their wheelchairs, watching autumn bloom in the Smokies.

The Ladies enjoy Fall arriving in the Smokies
The Ladies enjoy Fall arriving in the Smokies

dsc06842

A great, Eden-like wealth of lush rhododendron, azalea, cotoneaster, mountain laurel and mountain ash greeted us at the trail’s climax – this route has its own microclimate, for sure.

dsc06836
View of the horizon from Charlie’s Bunion path
dsc06824
So lush and verdant, you can hardly believe it
dsc06831
Nice outcroppings, all stacked slate
dsc06835
Rocky path, all the way

Campfires have now become a regular part of our nightly routine at the park facilities. As George (firestarter extraordinaire) notes, it’s the perfect wind-down activity to end a busy day – nothing like chatting over the fire as you stare into the roaring flames and the red embers. Way better than being crouched over a PC screen. We have the chance to review all the wonders seen during the day, and look ahead to what we might see tomorrow, in front of setting sun and glowing fire.

One side note to the GSMNP that is really central to the area’s history: the town of Cherokee is on the southern boundary of the park. It and the east-lying Cherokee Qualla reservation belong to the eastern tribe of Cherokees, those who fought to stay in their native homeland during the Trail of Tears forced evacuation. It is humbling and highly informative to visit the town and reservation, especially the Qualla Arts Center and Cherokee History Museum. That the tribe can welcome non-Indian visitors into their community with friendship and hospitality after all that was taken away from them during colonization is nothing short of amazing. Well worth the time spent.

Each evening as we returned to Smokemont camp, we’d find the main park road clogged by tourists stopped in their vehicles to observe 15 head of elk gathered in the fields and river bed. It’s elk mating season here in mid-October, the animals are in their prime, and these elk have specifically been resettled from Northern Wisconsin to repopulate the park. They are beautiful, and seemingly well acclimated to the watchful audience. Rangers and visitors are thrilled to have them back, and for the most part, the latter are willing to give them wide berth as a bull elk in rut can be a very unpredictable and aggressive creature.

Our last GSMNP event was a 2.5-hour trail ride on two beautiful horses, a paint named Shadow and a chestnut quarterhorse named Jake, with a Cherokee guide who taught us many interesting things about the area. He wants to get goats for his growing family, so naturally we recommended Oberhasli’s! We’re thinking we’d enjoy spending more time on horseback, we’ll have to look into lessons at our neighborhood horse stables when we get back! There was just not enough time to do everything the GSMNP has to offer, so we’ll be coming back.

George on Jake
George on Jake